Ryan R. Murray, DDS
Megan R. Murray, DDS
Murray Family Dentistry

Louisville Office
133B S. McCaslin Blvd.
Louisville, CO 80027
(303) 666-4900

Longmont Office
1332 Linden Street #2
Longmont, CO 80501
(303) 772-2392

Our Blog

Thanksgiving Trivia

November 26th, 2014

At Murray Family Dentistry we love learning trivia and interesting facts about Thanksgiving! This year, Dr. Ryan and Megan Murray wanted to share some trivia that might help you feel a bit smarter at the holiday dinner table and help create some great conversation with friends and family.

The Turkey

There is no historical evidence that turkey was eaten at the first Thanksgiving dinner. It was a three-day party shared by the Wamponoag Indians and the pilgrims in 1621. Historians say they likely ate venison and seafood.

According to National Geographic, the dinner at the Plymouth colony was in October and included about 50 English colonists and 90 American Indian men. The first Thanksgiving dinner could have included corn, geese, and pumpkin.

Today, turkey is the meat of choice. According to the National Turkey Association, about 690 million pounds of turkey are consumed during Thanksgiving, or about 46 million turkeys.

The Side Dishes

The green bean casserole became popular about 50 years ago. Created by the Campbell Soup Company, it remains a popular side dish. According to Campbell’s, it was developed when the company was creating an annual holiday cookbook. The company now sells about $20 million worth of cream of mushroom soup each year, which is a major part of the recipe.

While there were likely plenty of cranberries for the pilgrims and Indians to enjoy, sugar was a luxury. What we know today as cranberry sauce was not around in those early Thanksgiving days. About 750 million pounds of cranberries are produced each year in the US, with about 30 percent consumed on Thanksgiving.

The Parade

Since Thanksgiving did not become a national holiday until Lincoln declared it in 1863, the annual parades were not yearly events until much later. The biggest parade that continues to draw crowds is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Beginning in 1924 with about 400 employees, they marched from Convent Avenue to 145th Street in New York City. Famous for the huge hot-air balloons today, it was actually live animals borrowed from the Central Park Zoo that were the stars of the show then.

However you choose to spend your Thanksgiving holiday, we wish you a safe, happy and healthy holiday with those you love.

What is CEREC® and what are its benefits?

November 19th, 2014

When you are having trouble with your teeth, one of the worst parts of the experience can be making multiple trips to the dentist instead of getting everything done in one trip. CEREC allows you to save time and get better results by taking advantage of advanced technology to restore your teeth with a crown, inlay, or onlay.

What is CEREC?

CEREC is the short term for Chairside Economical Restoration of Esthetic Ceramics, or CEramic REConstruction. CEREC uses CAD/CAM (computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing) technology to take impressions quickly and generate a precisely fitted filling so you can leave Murray Family Dentistry sooner.

How can CEREC help you?

One of the biggest advantages of CEREC is its convenience. If you need a crown, inlay, or onlay, you can get your teeth restored during a single trip to Murray Family Dentistry. Traditionally, these procedures require two trips to the dentist.

During the first, the dentist cleans the tooth, makes a mold, and places a temporary restoration onto the tooth. In a couple of weeks, after the permanent restoration is ready, you need to return to the office so that the dentist can remove the temporary fix and place the permanent one.

The CEREC process lets you receive your permanent restoration right here in our Louisville or Longmont, CO office, so you do not have to live for weeks with a temporary fix and schedule another appointment. In addition, Dr. Ryan and Megan Murray and our team use digital impressions to make a mold for the filling. This is more comfortable and accurate than traditional impressions with plaster.

Another benefit of CEREC is that it uses a single block of solid ceramic materials instead of pressed ceramic and metal. CEREC restorations are able to withstand moderate chewing so yours will last for years. The lifespan of a CEREC restoration is longer than similar work with traditional methods. In addition, the color of CEREC ceramic is closer to the color of your natural teeth, which will make your restoration virtually unnoticeable.

For more information about CEREC single-visit restorations, contact Murray Family Dentistry.

The CEREC® Treatment Process

November 12th, 2014

If you’ve ever wondered why restorative dentistry takes so long or requires so many appointments, you’ll be pleased to learn about CEREC, or Chairside Economical Restoration of Esthetic Ceramics, also known as CEramic REstoration. This high-tech approach can get you finished with your treatment in a single dental visit at our Louisville or Longmont, CO office. This is what you should know about the CEREC treatment process.

You get digital impressions with CEREC.

CEREC is a type of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) dentistry. Dr. Ryan and Megan Murray and our team will prepare your tooth and then take a digital image using specialized equipment and software. Next, the onlay, crown, or other restorative device is manufactured on-site. Since the process is digitalized, it’s comfortable and accurate.

Treatment only takes a single visit.

Nobody likes going to the dentist multiple times for a single problem. Among the most inconvenient parts about getting a crown is needing two appointments. During the first visit, you not only need to have a mold taken, which is uncomfortable enough in itself. You also need to have a temporary crown put on the tooth and hope that it lasts, without much discomfort, until your second visit.

With CEREC, the digital impression is used to quickly produce your final crown on-site. That means we can apply your crown and you’ll be ready to go. You don’t need to return for a second appointment in a few weeks.

CEREC materials are made of porcelain or ceramics.

Some crowns, bridges, and fillings are made of metal. While lead-free metals can be safe, silver and gold-colored objects in your mouth aren’t attractive. CEREC crowns and bridges are made of ceramic, and fillings are porcelain. They are closer to the natural color of your teeth. In addition, porcelain fillings can be more durable than composite ones.

CEREC lets you avoid multiple trips to the dentist, and it can also give better results. Ask Dr. Ryan and Megan Murray about CEREC to find out whether it is an option for you.

Four Oral Health Issues Seniors Face

November 5th, 2014

Oral health is an important and often overlooked component of an older person’s general health and well-being. Dr. Ryan and Megan Murray and our team know that for many of our older patients, oral health can become an issue when arthritis or other neurological problems render them unable to brush or floss their teeth as effectively as they once did. Today, we thought we would discuss four common oral health issues our older patients face and how they can avoid them:

Cavities: It’s not just children who get tooth decay—oral decay is a common disease in people 65 and older. Ninety-two percent of seniors 65 and older have had dental caries in their permanent teeth, according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. The risk for tooth decay increases because many older adults don’t go to the dentist as often as they used to, thus cavities go undetected and untreated for longer than they should. Keeping regular appointments with Dr. Ryan and Megan Murray is the key to getting cavities treated in a timely manner.

Difficulty eating: Oral health problems, whether from missing teeth, cavities, dentures that don’t fit, gum disease, or infection, can cause difficulty eating and can force people to adjust the quality, consistency, and balance of their diet.

Dry mouth: Also called xerostomia, dry mouth is a common issue for a lot of seniors. Our friends at the Oral Cancer Foundation estimate that 20 percent of elderly people suffer from dry mouth, which means the reduced flow of saliva (saliva plays a crucial role in preventing tooth decay). Many seniors are on multiple medications for a variety of chronic illnesses or conditions. Common medications taken that may cause dry mouth are decongestants, antihistamines, blood pressure medications, pain pills, incontinence medications, antidepressants, diuretics, muscle relaxers, and Parkinson’s disease medications. To help counter this, we suggest drinking lots of fluids and limiting your intake of caffeine and alcohol. We also encourage you to check with Dr. Ryan and Megan Murray during your next visit if you think your medications are causing your mouth to feel dry.

Gum Disease: Gum (periodontal) disease is an infection of the gums and surrounding tissues that hold teeth in place. While gum disease affects people of all ages, it typically becomes worse as people age. In its early stages, gum disease is painless, and most people have no idea that they have it. In more advanced cases, however, gum disease can cause sore gums and pain when chewing.

Gum disease, which can range from simple gum inflammation to serious disease, is usually caused by poor brushing and flossing habits that allow dental plaque to build up on the teeth. Plaque that is not removed can harden and form tartar that brushing simply does not clean. Only a professional cleaning at our office can remove tartar. The two forms of gum disease are gingivitis and periodontitis. In gingivitis, the gums become red, swollen, and can bleed easily; in periodontitis, gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces that become infected.

Proper brushing, flossing, and visiting our office regularly can prevent gum disease. Seniors with limited dexterity who have trouble gripping a toothbrush should ask Dr. Ryan and Megan Murray about modifying a handle for easier use or switching to a battery-powered toothbrush.


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